Divorce After 40: 4 Questions Answered

27 Aug Divorce After 40: 4 Questions Answered

Divorce rates for older people are on the rise in the United States. One report noted that the rate for those over 40 rose nearly fifteen percent in the past 25 years and spiked sharply for those over 50 as well. Some experts believe this rise is due to the circumstances that surrounded many marriages in the past, such as pregnancy and economic factors. If you are facing divorce after 40, knowing the answers to some common questions may give you the confidence to move forward on your own.

1.    When Can You Start Dating Again?

 

Some women feel it is their right to date before their divorce is final, while others feel it is more discreet to wait. Many factors can influence your decision, such as societal pressure and how your grown children might react. Ultimately, the decision depends on how comfortable you are, but it may be less complicated to wait until money and property issues are settled.

2.    Are My Reasons Valid?

There are many reasons for the commonality of gray divorce these days, and you may wonder if the reasons you have for wanting one are valid. Whether you feel you have grown apart from your spouse or that your goals no longer align when it comes to your upcoming retirement years, you may have more than one reason for the split. One of the most effective ways to face your feelings is to seek the help of a counselor or a lawyer.

Consulting a law firm, such as Tully Rinckey Law, may help you be more honest with yourself about wanting to divorce. Discussing your situation with a qualified lawyer may allow you to see your marriage in a new light and give you peace of mind that what you are doing is the best possible choice for your future.

3.    Will My Children Understand?

Even grown children can be affected by divorce, especially if their older parents remarry afterward and the relationship with their stepfather or stepmother is awkward. However, you can ease the way to the future by sitting down with your children well ahead of time and explaining your circumstance. While this will probably be simpler than for married couples with young children, they may still have questions, so it is important that you answer them as best you can.

If you and your spouse are settling amicably, it may help if you speak to your children together. Let them know that this is a decision you have made together for and that none of their actions, past or present, are the cause of the split. Talking to them jointly might also allow you to answer their questions in one sitting rather than make them endure multiple discussions.

4.    How Can I Separate My Assets From My Spouse?

If you and your spouse have always shared bank accounts, loans, and other financial property, you may wonder how to move some of your assets over to a new, single account. Since divorce can be expensive, this can be an important issue. If you have a financial advisor, you may want to discuss your options with him or her. If not, consult a divorce firm; Tully Rinckey can help you understand your financial options and how paying for a marital split may affect them.

One important factor in dividing assets can be any outstanding joint debt you and your spouse might have. Be sure to take your financial records with you if you plan to meet with a lawyer.

Divorce after 40 can be a challenge and may cause you to feel unsure about your future. However, asking yourself a few questions and taking the time to find their answers can help you feel more secure, no matter the conditions of the split.

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